Florida Traffic Laws (Section 7)

316.300: Certain vehicles to carry flares or other devices. – (1) – No person shall operate any truck, bus, truck tractor, trailer, semitrailer, pole trailer, or motor vehicle towing a house trailer, when such vehicle is 80 inches or more in overall width or 30 feet or more in overall length, upon any highway outside an urban district or upon any divided highway at any time between sunset and sunrise unless there is carried in such vehicle the following equipment, except as provided in subsection (2):

(a) – At least three flares, three red electric lanterns, or three portable red emergency reflectors, each of which shall be capable of being seen and distinguished at a distance of not less than 600 feet under normal atmospheric conditions at nighttime. No flare, fusee, electric lantern, or warning flag shall be used for the purpose of compliance with the requirements of this section unless such equipment is of a type which has been submitted to the department and approved by it. No portable reflector unit shall be used for the purpose of compliance with the requirements of this section unless it is so designed and constructed as to be capable of reflecting red light clearly visible from all distances within 600 feet to 100 feet under normal atmospheric conditions at night when directly in front of lawful lower beams of headlamps and unless it is of a type which has been submitted to the department and approved by it.

(b) – At least three red-burning fusees, unless red electric lanterns or red portable emergency reflectors are carried.

(2) – No person shall operate at the time and under conditions stated in subsection (1) any motor vehicle used for the transportation of explosives or any cargo tank truck used for the transportation of flammable liquids or compressed gases unless there is carried in such vehicle three red electric lanterns or three portable red emergency reflectors meeting the requirements of subsection (1), and there shall not be carried in any such vehicle any flares, fusees, or signal produced by flame.

(3) – No person shall operate any vehicle described in subsection (1) or subsection (2) upon any highway outside an urban district or upon a divided highway at any time when lighted lamps are not required by s. 316.217 unless there is carried in such vehicle at least two red flags, not less than 12 inches square, with standards to support such flags, or two red portable emergency reflectors of the type described in subsection (1).

(4) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 1, ch. 81-49; s. 213, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.274.

316.301: Display of warning lights and devices when vehicle is stopped or disabled. – (1) – Whenever any truck, bus, truck tractor, trailer, semitrailer, or pole trailer 80 inches or more in overall width or 30 feet or more in overall length is stopped upon a roadway or adjacent shoulder, the driver shall immediately actuate vehicular hazard-warning signal lamps meeting the requirements of this chapter. Such lights need not be displayed by a vehicle parked lawfully in an urban district, or stopped lawfully to receive or discharge passengers, or stopped to avoid conflict with other traffic or to comply with the directions of a police officer or an official traffic control device, or while the devices specified in subsections (2)-(8) are in place.

(2) – Whenever any vehicle of a type referred to in subsection (1) is disabled, or stopped for more than 10 minutes, upon a roadway outside an urban district at any time when lighted lamps are required, the driver of such vehicle shall display the following warning devices except as provided in subsection (3):

(a) – A lighted fusee, a lighted red electric lantern, or a portable red emergency reflector shall immediately be placed at the traffic side of the vehicle in the direction of the nearest approaching traffic.

(b) – As soon thereafter as possible but in any event within the burning period of the fusee (15 minutes), the driver shall place three liquid-burning flares (pot torches), or three lighted red electric lanterns, or three portable red emergency reflectors on the roadway in the following order:

1. – One approximately 100 feet from the disabled vehicle in the center of the lane occupied by such vehicle and toward traffic approaching in that lane;

2. – One approximately 100 feet in the opposite direction from the disabled vehicle and in the center of the traffic lane occupied by such vehicle; and

3. – One at the traffic side of the disabled vehicle not less than 10 feet rearward or forward thereof in the direction of the nearest approaching traffic. If a lighted red electric lantern or a red portable emergency reflector has been placed at the traffic side of the vehicle in accordance with paragraph (a), it may be used for this purpose.

(3) – Whenever any vehicle referred to in this section is disabled, or stopped for more than 10 minutes, within 500 feet of a curve, hill crest, or other obstruction to view, the warning device in that direction shall be so placed as to afford ample warning to other users of the highway, but in no case less than 100 feet nor more than 500 feet from the disabled vehicle.

(4) – Whenever any vehicle of a type referred to in this section is disabled, or stopped for more than 10 minutes, upon any roadway of a divided highway during the time lighted lamps are required, the appropriate warning devices prescribed in subsections (2) and (5) shall be placed as follows:

(a) – One at a distance of approximately 200 feet from the vehicle in the center of the lane occupied by the stopped vehicle and in the direction of traffic approaching in that lane.

(b) – One at a distance of approximately 100 feet from the vehicle, in the center of the lane occupied by the vehicle and in the direction of traffic approaching in that lane.

(c) – One at the traffic side of the vehicle and approximately 10 feet from the vehicle in the direction of the nearest approaching traffic.

(5) – Whenever any motor vehicle used in the transportation of explosives or any cargo tank truck used for the transportation of any flammable liquid or compressed flammable gas is disabled, or stopped for more than 10 minutes, at any time and place mentioned in subsection (2), subsection (3), or subsection (4), the driver of such vehicle shall immediately display red electric lanterns or portable red emergency reflectors in the same number and manner specified therein. Flares, fusees, or signals produced by flame shall not be used as warning devices for disabled vehicles of the type mentioned in this subsection.

(6) – The warning devices described in subsections (2)-(5) need not be displayed where there is sufficient light to reveal persons and vehicles within a distance of 1,000 feet.

(7) – Whenever any vehicle described in this section is disabled, or stopped for more than 10 minutes, upon a roadway outside an urban district or upon the roadway of a divided highway at any time when lighted lamps are not required by s. 316.217, the driver of the vehicle shall display two red flags or two red portable emergency reflectors as follows:

(a) – If traffic on the roadway moves in two directions, one flag or reflector shall be placed approximately 100 feet to the rear and one flag or reflector approximately 100 feet in advance of the vehicle in the center of the lane occupied by such vehicle.

(b) – Upon a one-way roadway, one flag or reflector shall be placed approximately 100 feet, and one flag or reflector approximately 200 feet, to the rear of the vehicle in the center of the lane occupied by such vehicle.

(8) – When any vehicle described in this section is stopped entirely off the roadway and on an adjacent shoulder at any time and place hereinbefore mentioned, the warning devices shall be placed, as nearly as practicable, on the shoulder near the edge of the roadway.

(9) – The flares, fusees, red electric lanterns, portable red emergency reflectors and flags to be displayed as required in this section shall conform with the requirements of this chapter applicable thereto.

(10) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-49; s. 214, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.230.

316.302: Commercial motor vehicles; safety regulations; transporters and shippers of hazardous materials; enforcement. – (1)(a) – All owners and drivers of commercial motor vehicles that are operated on the public highways of this state while engaged in interstate commerce are subject to the rules and regulations contained in 49 C.F.R. parts 382, 385, and 390-397.

(b) – Except as otherwise provided in this section, all owners or drivers of commercial motor vehicles that are engaged in intrastate commerce are subject to the rules and regulations contained in 49 C.F.R. parts 382, 383, 385, and 390-397, with the exception of 49 C.F.R. s. 390.5 as it relates to the definition of bus, as such rules and regulations existed on December 31, 2012.

(c) – The emergency exceptions provided by 49 C.F.R. s. 392.82 also apply to communications by utility drivers and utility contractor drivers during a Level 1 activation of the State Emergency Operations Center, as provided in the Florida Comprehensive Emergency Management plan, or during a state of emergency declared by executive order or proclamation of the Governor.

(d) – Except as provided in s. 316.215(5), and except as provided in s. 316.228 for rear overhang lighting and flagging requirements for intrastate operations, the requirements of this section supersede all other safety requirements of this chapter for commercial motor vehicles.

(2)(a) – A person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce not transporting any hazardous material in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172 need not comply with 49 C.F.R. ss. 391.11(b)(1) and 395.3(a) and (b).

(b) – Except as provided in 49 C.F.R. s. 395.1, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce not transporting any hazardous material in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172 may not drive:

1. – More than 12 hours following 10 consecutive hours off duty; or

2. – For any period after the end of the 16th hour after coming on duty following 10 consecutive hours off duty.

The provisions of this paragraph do not apply to drivers of utility service vehicles as defined in 49 C.F.R. s. 395.2.

(c) – Except as provided in 49 C.F.R. s. 395.1, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce not transporting any hazardous material in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172 may not drive after having been on duty more than 70 hours in any period of 7 consecutive days or more than 80 hours in any period of 8 consecutive days if the motor carrier operates every day of the week. Thirty-four consecutive hours off duty shall constitute the end of any such period of 7 or 8 consecutive days. This weekly limit does not apply to a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely within this state while transporting, during harvest periods, any unprocessed agricultural products or unprocessed food or fiber that is subject to seasonal harvesting from place of harvest to the first place of processing or storage or from place of harvest directly to market or while transporting livestock, livestock feed, or farm supplies directly related to growing or harvesting agricultural products. Upon request of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, motor carriers shall furnish time records or other written verification to that department so that the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles can determine compliance with this subsection. These time records must be furnished to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles within 2 days after receipt of that department’s request. Falsification of such information is subject to a civil penalty not to exceed $100. The provisions of this paragraph do not apply to operators of farm labor vehicles operated during a state of emergency declared by the Governor or operated pursuant to s. 570.07(21), and do not apply to drivers of utility service vehicles as defined in 49 C.F.R. s. 395.2.

(d) – A person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce not transporting any hazardous material in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172 within a 150 air-mile radius of the location where the vehicle is based need not comply with 49 C.F.R. s. 395.8, if the requirements of 49 C.F.R. s. 395.1(e)(1)(iii) and (v) are met. If a driver is not released from duty within 12 hours after the driver arrives for duty, the motor carrier must maintain documentation of the driver’s driving times throughout the duty period.

(e) – A person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce is exempt from subsection (1) while transporting agricultural products, including horticultural or forestry products, from farm or harvest place to the first place of processing or storage, or from farm or harvest place directly to market. However, such person must comply with 49 C.F.R. parts 382, 392, and 393, and with 49 C.F.R. ss. 396.3(a)(1) and 396.9. A vehicle or combination of vehicles operated pursuant to this paragraph having a gross vehicle weight of 26,001 pounds or more or having three or more axles on the power unit, regardless of weight, must display the name of the vehicle owner or motor carrier and the municipality or town where the vehicle is based on each side of the power unit in letters that contrast with the background and that are readable from a distance of 50 feet. A person who violates this vehicle identification requirement may be assessed a penalty as provided in s. 316.3025(3)(a).

(f) – A person who operates a commercial motor vehicle having a declared gross vehicle weight of less than 26,001 pounds solely in intrastate commerce and who is not transporting hazardous materials in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172, or who is transporting petroleum products as defined in s. 376.301, is exempt from subsection (1). However, such person must comply with 49 C.F.R. parts 382, 392, and 393, and with 49 C.F.R. ss. 396.3(a)(1) and 396.9.

(g) – A person whose driving record shows no convictions for the preceding 3 years and who, as of October 1, 1988, is employed as a driver-salesperson, as defined in 49 C.F.R. s. 395.2, and who operates solely in intrastate commerce, is exempt from 49 C.F.R. part 391.

(h) – A person who is an employee of an electric utility, as defined in s. 361.11, or a telephone company, as defined in s. 364.02, and who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce and within a 200 air-mile radius of the location where the vehicle is based, is exempt from 49 C.F.R. ss. 396.11 and 396.13 and 49 C.F.R. part 391, subparts D and E.

(i) – A person whose driving record shows no traffic convictions, pursuant to s. 322.61, during the 2-year period immediately preceding the application for the commercial driver license, who is otherwise qualified as a driver under 49 C.F.R. part 391, and who operates a commercial vehicle in intrastate commerce only shall be exempt from the requirements of 49 C.F.R. part 391, subpart E, s. 391.41(b)(10). However, such operators are still subject to the requirements of ss. 322.12 and 322.121. As proof of eligibility, such driver shall have in his or her possession a physical examination form dated within the past 24 months.

(j) – A person who is otherwise qualified as a driver under 49 C.F.R. part 391, who operates a commercial motor vehicle in intrastate commerce only, and who does not transport hazardous materials in amounts that require placarding pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 172, is exempt from the requirements of 49 C.F.R. part 391, subpart E, ss. 391.41(b)(3) and 391.43(e), relating to diabetes.

(k) – A person holding a commercial driver license who is a regularly employed driver of a commercial motor vehicle and is subject to an alcohol and controlled substance testing program related to that employment shall not be required to be part of a separate testing program for operating any bus owned and operated by a church when the driver does not receive any form of compensation for operating the bus and when the bus is used to transport people to or from church-related activities at no charge. The provisions of this paragraph may not be implemented if the Federal Government notifies the department that implementation will adversely affect the allocation of federal funds to the state.

(3) – A person who has not attained 18 years of age may not operate a commercial motor vehicle, except that a person who has not attained 18 years of age may operate a commercial motor vehicle which has a gross vehicle weight of less than 26,001 pounds while transporting agricultural products, including horticultural or forestry products, from farm or harvest place to storage or market.

(4)(a) – Except as provided in this subsection, all commercial motor vehicles transporting any hazardous material on any road, street, or highway open to the public, whether engaged in interstate or intrastate commerce, and any person who offers hazardous materials for such transportation, are subject to the regulations contained in 49 C.F.R. part 107, subparts F and G, and 49 C.F.R. parts 171, 172, 173, 177, 178, and 180. Effective July 1, 1997, the exceptions for intrastate motor carriers provided in 49 C.F.R. 173.5 and 173.8 are hereby adopted.

(b) – In addition to the penalties provided in s. 316.3025(3)(b), (c), (d), and (e), any motor carrier or any of its officers, drivers, agents, representatives, employees, or shippers of hazardous materials that do not comply with this subsection or any rule adopted by a state agency that is consistent with the federal rules and regulations regarding hazardous materials commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083. To ensure compliance with this subsection, state highway patrol officers may inspect shipping documents and cargo of any vehicle known or suspected to be a transporter of hazardous materials.

(5) – The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles may adopt and revise rules to assure the safe operation of commercial motor vehicles. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles may enter into cooperative agreements as provided in 49 C.F.R. part 388. Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles personnel may conduct motor carrier and shipper compliance reviews for the purpose of determining compliance with this section and s. 627.7415.

(6) – The state Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles shall perform the duties that are assigned to the Field Administrator, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under the federal rules, and an agent of that department may enforce those rules.

(7) – A person who operates a commercial motor vehicle solely in intrastate commerce shall direct to the state Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles any communication that the federal rules require persons subject to the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Transportation to direct to that department.

(8) – For the purpose of enforcing this section, any law enforcement officer of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles or duly appointed agent who holds a current safety inspector certification from the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance may require the driver of any commercial vehicle operated on the highways of this state to stop and submit to an inspection of the vehicle or the driver’s records. If the vehicle or driver is found to be operating in an unsafe condition, or if any required part or equipment is not present or is not in proper repair or adjustment, and the continued operation would present an unduly hazardous operating condition, the officer may require the vehicle or the driver to be removed from service pursuant to the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria, until corrected. However, if continuous operation would not present an unduly hazardous operating condition, the officer may give written notice requiring correction of the condition within 14 days.

(a) – Any member of the Florida Highway Patrol or any law enforcement officer employed by a sheriff’s office or municipal police department authorized to enforce the traffic laws of this state pursuant to s. 316.640 who has reason to believe that a vehicle or driver is operating in an unsafe condition may, as provided in subsection (10), enforce the provisions of this section.

(b) – Any person who fails to comply with an officer’s request to submit to an inspection under this subsection commits a violation of s. 843.02 if the person resists the officer without violence or a violation of s. 843.01 if the person resists the officer with violence.

(9) – This section does not apply to any nonpublic sector bus.

(10) – Any traffic enforcement officer or any person otherwise authorized to enforce this section may issue a traffic citation as provided by s. 316.650 to an alleged violator of any provision of this section.

(11) – In addition to any other penalty provided in this section, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle that bears an identification number required by this section which is false, fraudulent, or displayed without the consent of the person to whom it is assigned commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

(12)(a) – Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, a provision, clause, covenant, or agreement contained in, collateral to, or affecting a motor carrier transportation contract that purports to indemnify, defend, or hold harmless, or has the effect of indemnifying, defending, or holding harmless, the promisee from or against any liability for loss or damage resulting from the negligence or intentional acts or omissions of the promisee is against the public policy of this state and is void and unenforceable.

(b) – As used in this subsection, the term “promisee” means the contract’s promisee and any agents, employees, servants, or independent contractors who are directly responsible to the contract’s promisee, except that the term does not include motor carriers which are party to a motor carrier transportation contract with the contract’s promisee, including such motor carrier’s agents, employees, servants, or independent contractors directly responsible to such motor carrier.

(c) – This subsection only applies to motor carrier transportation contracts entered into or renewed on or after July 1, 2010.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 1, ch. 79-254; s. 24, ch. 82-186; s. 3, ch. 83-218; s. 63, ch. 85-180; s. 2, ch. 87-270; s. 1, ch. 87-536; s. 1, ch. 88-2; s. 1, ch. 88-306; ss. 61, 65, ch. 89-282; s. 1, ch. 90-200; ss. 23, 24, ch. 90-227; s. 1, ch. 90-355; s. 1, ch. 91-243; s. 10, ch. 92-316; s. 25, ch. 94-306; s. 901, ch. 95-148; s. 2, ch. 95-247; s. 3, ch. 95-317; s. 19, ch. 96-263; s. 15, ch. 96-277; s. 8, ch. 97-280; s. 32, ch. 97-300; s. 16, ch. 98-189; s. 92, ch. 99-13; s. 215, ch. 99-248; s. 11, ch. 99-385; s. 3, ch. 2002-20; s. 11, ch. 2003-286; s. 4, ch. 2005-50; ss. 8, 38, ch. 2005-164; s. 18, ch. 2006-290; s. 8, ch. 2008-176; s. 10, ch. 2010-225; s. 9, ch. 2011-66; s. 43, ch. 2012-5; s. 9, ch. 2012-128; s. 11, ch. 2012-181; s. 13, ch. 2013-160.

Note. – Former s. 316.286.

316.3025: Penalties. – (1) – A commercial motor vehicle that is found to be operating in such an unsafe condition as to be declared out-of-service or a driver declared out-of-service or removed from driving status pursuant to the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria must be repaired or returned to driving status before being returned to service.

(2) – Any person who owns, operates, or causes or permits a commercial motor vehicle that has been declared out-of-service pursuant to the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria to be driven before the completion of required repairs is subject to the imposition of a penalty as provided in 49 C.F.R. s. 383.53, in addition to any other penalties imposed against him or her. Any person who operates a commercial motor vehicle while he or she is declared out-of-service or removed from driving status pursuant to the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria, or who causes or permits such out-of-service driver to operate a commercial motor vehicle, is subject to the imposition of a penalty as provided in 49 C.F.R. s. 383.53, in addition to any other penalties imposed against the person.

(3)(a) – A civil penalty of $50 may be assessed for a violation of the identification requirements of 49 C.F.R. s. 390.21 or s. 316.302(2)(e).

(b) – A civil penalty of $100 may be assessed for:

1. – Each violation of the North American Uniform Driver Out-of-Service Criteria;

2. – A violation of s. 316.302(2)(b) or (c);

3. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 392.60;

4. – A violation of the North American Standard Vehicle Out-of-Service Criteria resulting from an inspection of a commercial motor vehicle involved in a crash; or

5. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 391.41.

(c) – A civil penalty of $250 may be assessed for:

1. – A violation of the placarding requirements of 49 C.F.R. parts 171-179;

2. – A violation of the shipping paper requirements of 49 C.F.R. parts 171-179;

3. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 392.10;

4. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 397.5;

5. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 397.7;

6. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 397.13; or

7. – A violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 397.15.

(d) – A civil penalty of $500 may be assessed for:

1. – Each violation of the North American Standard Hazardous Materials Out-of-Service Criteria;

2. – Each violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 390.19, for failure of an interstate or intrastate motor carrier to register;

3. – Each violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 392.9a, for failure of an interstate motor carrier to obtain operating authority; or

4. – Each violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 392.9a, for operating beyond the scope of an interstate motor carrier’s operating authority.

(e) – A civil penalty not to exceed $5,000 in the aggregate may be assessed for violations found in the conduct of compliance reviews pursuant to s. 316.302(5). A civil penalty not to exceed $25,000 in the aggregate may be assessed for violations found in a followup compliance review conducted within a 24-month period. A civil penalty not to exceed $25,000 in the aggregate may be assessed and the motor carrier may be enjoined pursuant to s. 316.3026 if violations are found after a second followup compliance review within 12 months after the first followup compliance review. Motor carriers found to be operating without insurance required by s. 627.7415 may be enjoined as provided in s. 316.3026.

(4) – A vehicle operated by an interstate motor carrier found to be in violation of 49 C.F.R. s. 392.9a may be placed out of service for the carrier’s failure to obtain operating authority or operating beyond the scope of its operating authority.

(5) – Whenever any person or motor carrier as defined in chapter 320 violates the provisions of this section and becomes indebted to the state because of such violation and refuses to pay the appropriate penalty, in addition to the provisions of s. 316.3026, such penalty becomes a lien upon the property including the motor vehicles of such person or motor carrier and may be seized and foreclosed by the state in a civil action in any court of this state. It shall be presumed that the owner of the motor vehicle is liable for the sum, and the vehicle may be detained or impounded until the penalty is paid.

(6)(a) – A driver who violates 49 C.F.R. s. 392.80, which prohibits texting while operating a commercial motor vehicle, or 49 C.F.R. s. 392.82, which prohibits using a handheld mobile telephone while operating a commercial motor vehicle, may be assessed a civil penalty and commercial driver license disqualification as follows:

1. – First violation: $500.

2. – Second violation: $1,000 and a 60-day commercial driver license disqualification pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 383.

3. – Third and subsequent violations: $2,750 and a 120-day commercial driver license disqualification pursuant to 49 C.F.R. part 383.

(b) – A company requiring or allowing a driver to violate 49 C.F.R. s. 392.80, which prohibits texting while operating a commercial motor vehicle, or 49 C.F.R. s. 392.82, which prohibits using a handheld mobile telephone while operating a commercial motor vehicle, may, in addition to any other penalty assessed, be assessed the following civil penalty. The driver shall not be charged with an offense for the first violation under this paragraph by the company.

1. – First violation: $2,750.

2. – Second violation: $5,000.

3. – Third and subsequent violations: $11,000.

(c) – The emergency exceptions provided by 49 C.F.R. s. 392.82 also apply to communications between utility drivers and utility contractor drivers during a Level 1 activation of the State Emergency Operations Center, as provided in the Florida Comprehensive Emergency Management plan, or during a state of emergency declared by executive order or proclamation of the Governor.

(7)(a) – Only an officer or agent of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is authorized to collect the penalty provided by this section. Such officer or agent shall cooperate with the owner or driver of the motor vehicle so as not to unduly delay the vehicle.

(b) – All penalties imposed and collected under this section shall be paid to the Chief Financial Officer, who shall credit the total amount collected to the State Transportation Trust Fund for use in repairing and maintaining the roads of this state.

(8) – Any person aggrieved by the imposition of a civil penalty pursuant to this section may apply to the Commercial Motor Vehicle Review Board for a modification, cancellation, or revocation of the penalty. The Commercial Motor Vehicle Review Board may modify, cancel, revoke, or sustain such penalty.

History – s. 3, ch. 87-270; s. 2, ch. 88-306; s. 62, ch. 89-282; s. 25, ch. 90-227; s. 326, ch. 95-148; s. 3, ch. 95-247; s. 216, ch. 99-248; s. 12, ch. 99-385; s. 4, ch. 2002-20; s. 356, ch. 2003-261; s. 12, ch. 2003-286; s. 10, ch. 2011-66; s. 14, ch. 2013-160.

316.3026: Unlawful operation of motor carriers. – (1) – The Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement may issue out-of-service orders to motor carriers, as defined in s. 320.01, who, after proper notice, have failed to pay any penalty or fine assessed by the department, or its agent, against any owner or motor carrier for violations of state law, refused to submit to a compliance review and provide records pursuant to s. 316.302(5) or s. 316.70, or violated safety regulations pursuant to s. 316.302 or insurance requirements in s. 627.7415. Such out-of-service orders have the effect of prohibiting the operations of any motor vehicles owned, leased, or otherwise operated by the motor carrier upon the roadways of this state, until the violations have been corrected or penalties have been paid. Out-of-service orders must be approved by the director of the Division of the Florida Highway Patrol or his or her designee. An administrative hearing pursuant to s. 120.569 shall be afforded to motor carriers subject to such orders.

(2) – Any motor carrier enjoined or prohibited from operating by an out-of-service order by this state, any other state, or the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration may not operate on the roadways of this state until the motor carrier has been authorized to resume operations by the originating enforcement jurisdiction. Commercial motor vehicles owned or operated by any motor carrier prohibited from operation found on the roadways of this state shall be placed out of service by law enforcement officers of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, and the motor carrier assessed a $10,000 civil penalty pursuant to 49 C.F.R. s. 383.53, in addition to any other penalties imposed on the driver or other responsible person. Any person who knowingly drives, operates, or causes to be operated any commercial motor vehicle in violation of an out-of-service order issued by the department in accordance with this section commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082(3)(e). Any costs associated with the impoundment or storage of such vehicles are the responsibility of the motor carrier. Vehicle out-of-service orders may be rescinded when the department receives proof of authorization for the motor carrier to resume operation.

(3) – In addition to the sanctions found in subsections (1) and (2), the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles may petition the circuit courts of this state to enjoin any motor carrier from operating when it fails to comply with out-of-service orders issued by a competent authority within or outside this state.

History – s. 4, ch. 87-270; s. 13, ch. 2003-286; s. 11, ch. 2011-66; s. 12, ch. 2012-181; s. 81, ch. 2013-160; s. 4, ch. 2014-220.

316.303: Television receivers. – (1) – No motor vehicle operated on the highways of this state shall be equipped with television-type receiving equipment so located that the viewer or screen is visible from the driver’s seat.

(2) – This section does not prohibit the use of television-type receiving equipment used exclusively for safety or law enforcement purposes, provided such use is approved by the department.

(3) – This section does not prohibit the use of an electronic display used in conjunction with a vehicle navigation system.

(4) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 26, ch. 94-306; s. 218, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.275.

316.304: Wearing of headsets. – (1) – No person shall operate a vehicle while wearing a headset, headphone, or other listening device, other than a hearing aid or instrument for the improvement of defective human hearing.

(2) – This section does not apply to:

(a) – Any law enforcement officer equipped with any communication device necessary in performing his or her assigned duties or to any emergency vehicle operator equipped with any ear protection device.

(b) – Any applicant for a license to operate a motorcycle while taking the examination required by s. 322.12(5).

(c) – Any person operating a motorcycle who is using a headset that is installed in a helmet and worn so as to prevent the speakers from making direct contact with the user’s ears so that the user can hear surrounding sounds.

(d) – Any person using a headset in conjunction with a cellular telephone that only provides sound through one ear and allows surrounding sounds to be heard with the other ear.

(e) – Any person using a headset in conjunction with communicating with the central base operation that only provides sound through one ear and allows surrounding sounds to be heard with the other ear.

(3) – The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles shall promulgate, by administrative rule, standards and specifications for headset equipment the use of which is permitted under this section. The department shall inspect and review all such devices submitted to it and shall publish a list by name and type of approved equipment.

(4) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 73-4; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 8, ch. 83-228; s. 4, ch. 84-284; s. 2, ch. 85-329; s. 24, ch. 87-161; s. 3, ch. 88-405; s. 3, ch. 92-18; s. 24, ch. 95-143; s. 327, ch. 95-148; s. 219, ch. 99-248; s. 105, ch. 2002-20.

Note. – Former s. 316.0285.

316.3045: Operation of radios or other mechanical soundmaking devices or instruments in vehicles; exemptions. – (1) – It is unlawful for any person operating or occupying a motor vehicle on a street or highway to operate or amplify the sound produced by a radio, tape player, or other mechanical soundmaking device or instrument from within the motor vehicle so that the sound is:

(a) – Plainly audible at a distance of 25 feet or more from the motor vehicle; or

(b) – Louder than necessary for the convenient hearing by persons inside the vehicle in areas adjoining churches, schools, or hospitals.

(2) – The provisions of this section shall not apply to any law enforcement motor vehicle equipped with any communication device necessary in the performance of law enforcement duties or to any emergency vehicle equipped with any communication device necessary in the performance of any emergency procedures.

(3) – The provisions of this section do not apply to motor vehicles used for business or political purposes, which in the normal course of conducting such business use soundmaking devices. The provisions of this subsection shall not be deemed to prevent local authorities, with respect to streets and highways under their jurisdiction and within the reasonable exercise of the police power, from regulating the time and manner in which such business may be operated.

(4) – The provisions of this section do not apply to the noise made by a horn or other warning device required or permitted by s. 316.271. The Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles shall promulgate rules defining “plainly audible” and establish standards regarding how sound should be measured by law enforcement personnel who enforce the provisions of this section.

(5) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 90-256; s. 220, ch. 99-248; s. 9, ch. 2005-164.

316.305: Wireless communications devices; prohibition. – (1) – This section may be cited as the “Florida Ban on Texting While Driving Law.”

(2) – It is the intent of the Legislature to:

(a) – Improve roadway safety for all vehicle operators, vehicle passengers, bicyclists, pedestrians, and other road users.

(b) – Prevent crashes related to the act of text messaging while driving a motor vehicle.

(c) – Reduce injuries, deaths, property damage, health care costs, health insurance rates, and automobile insurance rates related to motor vehicle crashes.

(d) – Authorize law enforcement officers to stop motor vehicles and issue citations as a secondary offense to persons who are texting while driving.

(3)(a) – A person may not operate a motor vehicle while manually typing or entering multiple letters, numbers, symbols, or other characters into a wireless communications device or while sending or reading data on such a device for the purpose of nonvoice interpersonal communication, including, but not limited to, communication methods known as texting, e-mailing, and instant messaging. As used in this section, the term “wireless communications device” means any handheld device used or capable of being used in a handheld manner, that is designed or intended to receive or transmit text or character-based messages, access or store data, or connect to the Internet or any communications service as defined in s. 812.15 and that allows text communications. For the purposes of this paragraph, a motor vehicle that is stationary is not being operated and is not subject to the prohibition in this paragraph.

(b) – Paragraph (a) does not apply to a motor vehicle operator who is:

1. – Performing official duties as an operator of an authorized emergency vehicle as defined in s. 322.01, a law enforcement or fire service professional, or an emergency medical services professional.

2. – Reporting an emergency or criminal or suspicious activity to law enforcement authorities.

3. – Receiving messages that are:

a. – Related to the operation or navigation of the motor vehicle;

b. – Safety-related information, including emergency, traffic, or weather alerts;

c. – Data used primarily by the motor vehicle; or

d. – Radio broadcasts.

4. – Using a device or system for navigation purposes.

5. – Conducting wireless interpersonal communication that does not require manual entry of multiple letters, numbers, or symbols, except to activate, deactivate, or initiate a feature or function.

6. – Conducting wireless interpersonal communication that does not require reading text messages, except to activate, deactivate, or initiate a feature or function.

7. – Operating an autonomous vehicle, as defined in s. 316.003, in autonomous mode.

(c) – Only in the event of a crash resulting in death or personal injury, a user’s billing records for a wireless communications device or the testimony of or written statements from appropriate authorities receiving such messages may be admissible as evidence in any proceeding to determine whether a violation of paragraph (a) has been committed.

(4)(a) – Any person who violates paragraph (3)(a) commits a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(b) – Any person who commits a second or subsequent violation of paragraph (3)(a) within 5 years after the date of a prior conviction for a violation of paragraph (3)(a) commits a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a moving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(5) – Enforcement of this section by state or local law enforcement agencies must be accomplished only as a secondary action when an operator of a motor vehicle has been detained for a suspected violation of another provision of this chapter, chapter 320, or chapter 322.

History – s. 1, ch. 2013-58; s. 53, ch. 2014-17.

316.400: Headlamps. – (1) – Every motorcycle and every motor-driven cycle shall be equipped with at least one and not more than two headlamps which shall comply with the requirements and limitations of this chapter.

(2) – Every headlamp upon every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle shall be located at a height of not more than 54 inches nor less than 24 inches to be measured as set forth in s. 316.217(3).

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 221, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.243.

316.405: Motorcycle headlights to be turned on. – (1) – Any person who operates a motorcycle or motor-driven cycle on the public streets or highways shall, while so engaged, have the headlight or headlights of such motorcycle or motor-driven cycle turned on. Failure to comply with this section during the hours from sunrise to sunset, unless compliance is otherwise required by law, shall not be admissible as evidence of negligence in a civil action. During the hours of operation between sunrise and sunset, the headlights may modulate either the upper beam or the lower beam from its maximum intensity to a lower intensity, in accordance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 571.108.

(2) – Failure to comply with the provisions of this section shall not be deemed negligence per se in any civil action, but the violation of this section may be considered on the issue of negligence if the violation of this section is a proximate cause of a crash.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a moving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – ss. 1, 2, ch. 71-351; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 222, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.2431.

316.410: Taillamps. – (1) – Every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle shall have at least one taillamp which shall be located at a height of not more than 72 nor less than 20 inches.

(2) – Either a taillamp or a separate lamp shall be so constructed and placed as to illuminate with a white light the rear registration plate and render it clearly legible from a distance of 50 feet to the rear. Any taillamp or taillamps, together with any separate lamp or lamps for illuminating the rear registration plate, shall be so wired as to be lighted whenever the headlamps or auxiliary driving lamps are lighted.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 223, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.244.

316.415: Reflectors. – Every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle shall carry on the rear, either as part of the taillamp or separately, at least one red reflector. A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 224, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.245.

316.420: Stop lamps. – Every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle shall be equipped with at least one stop lamp meeting the requirements of s. 316.234(1). A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 225, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.246.

316.425: Lamps on parked motorcycles. – (1) – Every motorcycle must comply with the provisions of s. 316.229 regarding lamps on parked vehicles and the use thereof.

(2) – Motor-driven cycles need not be equipped with parking lamps or otherwise comply with the provisions of s. 316.229.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 226, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.247.

316.430: Multiple-beam road-lighting equipment. – (1) – Every motorcycle other than a motor-driven cycle shall be equipped with multiple-beam road-lighting equipment.

(2) – Such equipment shall:

(a) – Reveal persons and vehicles at a distance of at least 300 feet ahead when the uppermost distribution of light is selected;

(b) – Reveal persons and vehicles at a distance of at least 150 feet ahead when the lowermost distribution of light is selected.

On a straight, level road under any condition of loading none of the high intensity portion of the beam shall be directed to strike the eyes of an approaching driver.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 227, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.248.

316.435: Lighting equipment for motor-driven cycles. – The headlamp or headlamps upon every motor-driven cycle may be of the single-beam or multiple-beam type, but in either event shall comply with the requirements and limitations as follows:

(1) – Every such headlamp or headlamps on a motor-driven cycle shall be of sufficient intensity to reveal persons and vehicles at a distance of not less than 100 feet when the motor-driven cycle is operated at any speed less than 25 miles per hour; at a distance of not less than 200 feet when the motor-driven cycle is operated at a speed of 25 or more miles per hour; and at a distance of not less than 300 feet when the motor-driven cycle is operated at a speed of 35 or more miles per hour.

(2) – In the event the motor-driven cycle is equipped with a multiple-beam headlamp or headlamps, such equipment shall comply with the requirements of s. 316.430(2).

A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; ss. 1, 29, ch. 76-31; s. 228, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.249.

316.440: Brake equipment required. – Every motor-driven cycle must comply with the provisions of s. 316.261, except that:

(1) – Motorcycles and motor-driven cycles need not be equipped with parking brakes.

(2) – The wheel of a sidecar attached to a motorcycle or to a motor-driven cycle, and the front wheel of a motor-driven cycle, need not be equipped with brakes, provided that such motorcycle or motor-driven cycle is capable of complying with the performance requirements of this chapter.

A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 229, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.264.

316.445: Performance ability of motorcycle brakes. – (1) – Every motorcycle and motor-driven cycle, at all times and under all conditions of loading, upon application of the service brake, shall be capable of:

(a) – Developing a braking force that is not less than 43.5 percent of its gross weight;

(b) – Decelerating to a stop from not more than 20 miles per hour at not less than 14 feet per second per second; and

(c) – Stopping from a speed of 20 miles per hour in not more than 30 feet, such distance to be measured from the point at which movement of the service brake pedal or control begins.

(2) – Tests for deceleration and stopping distance shall be made on a substantially level (not to exceed plus or minus 1 percent grade), dry, smooth, hard surface that is free from loose material.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 230, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.265.

316.450: Brakes on motor-driven cycles. – (1) – The department is authorized to require an inspection of the braking system on any motor-driven cycle and to disapprove any such braking system on a vehicle which it finds will not comply with the performance ability standard set forth in s. 316.445 or which in its opinion is equipped with a braking system that is not so designed or constructed as to ensure reasonable and reliable performance in actual use.

(2) – The department may refuse to register or may suspend or revoke the registration of any vehicle referred to in this section when it determines that the braking system thereon does not comply with the provisions of this section.

(3) – No person shall operate on any highway any vehicle referred to in this section in the event the department has disapproved the braking system upon such vehicle.

(4) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; ss. 1, 30, ch. 76-31; s. 231, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.266.

316.455: Other equipment. – Every motorcycle and every motor-driven cycle when operated upon a highway shall comply with the requirements and limitations of:

(1) – Section 316.271(1) and (2) on the requirement for horns and warning devices.

(2) – Section 316.271(3) on the requirement for the use of horns.

(3) – Section 316.271(4) on the requirement for sirens, whistles, and bells.

(4) – Section 316.271(5) on the requirement for theft alarms.

(5) – Section 316.271(6) on the requirement for emergency vehicles.

(6) – Section 316.272 on the requirement for mufflers and prevention of noise.

(7) – Section 316.294 on the requirement for mirrors.

A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; ss. 1, 31, ch. 76-31; s. 5, ch. 86-36; s. 24, ch. 91-221; s. 232, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.277.

316.46: Equipment regulations for mopeds. – No person may operate a moped that does not conform to all applicable federal motor vehicle safety standards relating to lights and safety and other equipment contained in Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations. A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 10, ch. 87-161; s. 233, ch. 99-248.

316.500: Exceeding weight and length; penalties. – It is a violation of this chapter for any person to drive or move, or for the owner to cause or knowingly permit to be driven or moved, on any highway any vehicle or vehicles of a size or weight exceeding the limitations stated in this chapter or otherwise in violation of this chapter, and the maximum size and weight of vehicles herein specified shall be lawful throughout this state. Local authorities shall have no power or authority to alter said limitations except as express authority may be granted in this chapter.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31.

Note. – Former s. 316.206.

316.510: Projecting loads on passenger vehicles. – No passenger type vehicle shall be operated on any highway with any load carried thereon extending beyond the fenders on the left side of the vehicle or extending more than 6 inches beyond the line of the fenders on the right side thereof. A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 234, ch. 99-248.

Note. – Former s. 316.197.

316.515: Maximum width, height, length. – (1) – WIDTH LIMITATION. – The total outside width of any vehicle or the load thereon may not exceed 102 inches, exclusive of safety devices determined by the department to be necessary for the safe and efficient operation of motor vehicles. The use of public roads that do not have at least one through lane of 12 feet or more in width in each direction, and the use of public roads deemed unsafe for wider vehicles on the basis of safety and engineering analyses, by vehicles exceeding 96 inches in width may be restricted by the Department of Transportation or by local officials for streets and roads under their respective jurisdictions. The total outside width of a noncommercial travel trailer, camping trailer, truck camper, motor home, or private motor coach as defined in s. 320.01 may be more than 102 inches if:

(a) – The excess width is attributable to appurtenances that do not extend beyond the exterior rearview mirrors installed on the motor home by the manufacturer or the exterior rearview mirrors of the tow vehicle; and

(b) – The exterior rearview mirrors only extend the distance necessary to provide the appropriate field of view for the vehicle before the appurtenances are attached.

(2) – HEIGHT LIMITATION. – No vehicle may exceed a height of 13 feet 6 inches, inclusive of load carried thereon. However, an automobile transporter may measure a height not to exceed 14 feet, inclusive of the load carried thereon.

(3) – LENGTH LIMITATION. – Except as otherwise provided in this section, length limitations apply solely to a semitrailer or trailer, and not to a truck tractor or to the overall length of a combination of vehicles. No combination of commercial motor vehicles coupled together and operating on the public roads may consist of more than one truck tractor and two trailing units. Unless otherwise specifically provided for in this section, a combination of vehicles not qualifying as commercial motor vehicles may consist of no more than two units coupled together; such nonqualifying combination of vehicles may not exceed a total length of 65 feet, inclusive of the load carried thereon, but exclusive of safety and energy conservation devices approved by the department for use on vehicles using public roads. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, a truck tractor-semitrailer combination engaged in the transportation of automobiles or boats may transport motor vehicles or boats on part of the power unit; and, except as may otherwise be mandated under federal law, an automobile or boat transporter semitrailer may not exceed 50 feet in length, exclusive of the load; however, the load may extend up to an additional 6 feet beyond the rear of the trailer. The 50-feet length limitation does not apply to non-stinger-steered automobile or boat transporters that are 65 feet or less in overall length, exclusive of the load carried thereon, or to stinger-steered automobile or boat transporters that are 75 feet or less in overall length, exclusive of the load carried thereon. For purposes of this subsection, a “stinger-steered automobile or boat transporter” is an automobile or boat transporter configured as a semitrailer combination wherein the fifth wheel is located on a drop frame located behind and below the rearmost axle of the power unit. Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b), any straight truck or truck tractor-semitrailer combination engaged in the transportation of horticultural trees may allow the load to extend up to an additional 10 feet beyond the rear of the vehicle, provided said trees are resting against a retaining bar mounted above the truck bed so that the root balls of the trees rest on the floor and to the front of the truck bed and the tops of the trees extend up over and to the rear of the truck bed, and provided the overhanging portion of the load is covered with protective fabric.

(a) – Straight trucks. – A straight truck may not exceed a length of 40 feet in extreme overall dimension, exclusive of safety and energy conservation devices approved by the department for use on vehicles using public roads. A straight truck may attach a forklift to the rear of the cargo bed, provided the overall combined length of the vehicle and the forklift does not exceed 50 feet. A straight truck may tow no more than one trailer, and the overall length of the truck-trailer combination may not exceed 68 feet, including the load thereon. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, a truck-trailer combination engaged in the transportation of boats, or boat trailers whose design dictates a front-to-rear stacking method may not exceed the length limitations of this paragraph exclusive of the load; however, the load may extend up to an additional 6 feet beyond the rear of the trailer.

(b) – Semitrailers. –

1. – A semitrailer operating in a truck tractor-semitrailer combination may not exceed 48 feet in extreme overall outside dimension, measured from the front of the unit to the rear of the unit and the load carried thereon, exclusive of safety and energy conservation devices approved by the department for use on vehicles using public roads, unless it complies with subparagraph 2. A semitrailer which exceeds 48 feet in length and is used to transport divisible loads may operate in this state only if issued a permit under s. 316.550 and if such trailer meets the requirements of this chapter relating to vehicle equipment and safety. Except for highways on the tandem trailer truck highway network, public roads deemed unsafe for longer semitrailer vehicles or those roads on which such longer vehicles are determined not to be in the interest of public convenience shall, in conformance with s. 316.006, be restricted by the Department of Transportation or by the local authority to use by semitrailers not exceeding a length of 48 feet, inclusive of the load carried thereon but exclusive of safety and energy conservation devices approved by the department for use on vehicles using public roads. Truck tractor-semitrailer combinations shall be afforded reasonable access to terminals; facilities for food, fuel, repairs, and rest; and points of loading and unloading.

2. – A semitrailer which is more than 48 feet but not more than 53 feet in extreme overall outside dimension, as measured pursuant to subparagraph 1., may operate on public roads, except roads on the State Highway System which are restricted by the Department of Transportation or other roads restricted by local authorities, if:

a. – The distance between the kingpin or other peg that locks into the fifth wheel of a truck tractor and the center of the rear axle or rear group of axles does not exceed 41 feet, or, in the case of a semitrailer used exclusively or primarily to transport vehicles in connection with motorsports competition events, the distance does not exceed 46 feet from the kingpin to the center of the rear axles; and

b. – It is equipped with a substantial rear-end underride protection device meeting the requirements of 49 C.F.R. s. 393.86, “Rear End Protection.”

(c) – Tandem trailer trucks. –

1. – Except for semitrailers and trailers of up to 281/2 feet in length which existed on December 1, 1982, and which were actually and lawfully operating on that date, no semitrailer or trailer operating in a truck tractor-semitrailer-trailer combination may exceed a length of 28 feet in extreme overall outside dimension, measured from the front of the unit to the rear of the unit and the load carried thereon, exclusive of safety and energy conservation devices approved by the Department of Transportation for use on vehicles using public roads.

2. – Tandem trailer trucks conforming to the weight and size limitations of this chapter and in immediate transit to or from a terminal facility as defined in this chapter may operate on the public roads of this state except for residential neighborhood streets restricted by the Department of Transportation or local jurisdictions. In addition, the Department of Transportation or local jurisdictions may restrict these vehicles from using streets and roads under their maintenance responsibility on the basis of safety and engineering analyses, provided that the restrictions are consistent with the provisions of this chapter. The Department of Transportation shall develop safety and engineering standards to be used by all jurisdictions when identifying public roads and streets to be restricted from tandem trailer truck operations.

3. – Except as otherwise provided in this section, within 5 miles of the Federal National Network for large trucks, tandem trailer trucks shall be afforded access to terminals; facilities for food, fuel, repairs, and rest; and points of loading and unloading.

4. – Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the contrary, all local system tandem trailer truck route review procedures must be consistent with those adopted by the Department of Transportation.

5. – Tandem trailer trucks employed as household goods carriers and conforming to the weight and size limitations of this chapter shall be afforded access to points of loading and unloading on the public streets and roads of this state, except for streets and roads that have been restricted from use by such vehicles on the basis of safety and engineering analyses by the jurisdiction responsible for maintenance of the streets and roads.

(d) – Maxi-cube vehicles. – Maxi-cube vehicles shall be allowed to operate on routes open to tandem trailer trucks under the same conditions applicable to tandem trailer trucks as specified by this section.

(4) – LOAD EXTENSION LIMITATION. – The load upon any vehicle operated alone, or the load upon the front vehicle of a combination of vehicles, may not extend more than 3 feet beyond the front wheels of the vehicle or the front bumper of the vehicle if it is equipped with a bumper.

(a) – The limitations of this subsection do not apply to bicycle racks carrying bicycles on public sector transit vehicles.

(b) – The provisions of this subsection shall not apply to a front-end loading collection vehicle, when:

1. – The front-end loading mechanism and container or containers are in the lowered position;

2. – The vehicle is engaged in collecting solid waste or recyclable or recovered materials;

3. – The vehicle is being operated at speeds less than 20 miles per hour with the vehicular hazard-warning lights activated; and

4. – The extension does not exceed 8 feet 6 inches.

(5) – IMPLEMENTS OF HUSBANDRY AND FARM EQUIPMENT; AGRICULTURAL TRAILERS; FORESTRY EQUIPMENT; SAFETY REQUIREMENTS. –

(a) – Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, straight trucks, agricultural tractors, citrus harvesting equipment, citrus fruit loaders, and cotton module movers, not exceeding 50 feet in length, or any combination of up to and including three implements of husbandry, including the towing power unit, and any single agricultural trailer with a load thereon or any agricultural implements attached to a towing power unit, or a self-propelled agricultural implement or an agricultural tractor, is authorized for the purpose of transporting peanuts, grains, soybeans, citrus, cotton, hay, straw, or other perishable farm products from their point of production to the first point of change of custody or of long-term storage, and for the purpose of returning to such point of production, or for the purpose of moving such tractors, movers, and implements from one point of agricultural production to another, by a person engaged in the production of any such product or custom hauler, if such vehicle or combination of vehicles otherwise complies with this section. The Department of Transportation may issue overlength permits for cotton module movers greater than 50 feet but not more than 55 feet in overall length. Such vehicles shall be operated in accordance with all safety requirements prescribed by law and rules of the Department of Transportation.

(b) – Notwithstanding any other provision of law, equipment not exceeding 136 inches in width and not capable of speeds exceeding 20 miles per hour which is used exclusively for harvesting forestry products is authorized for the purpose of transporting equipment from one point of harvest to another point of harvest, not to exceed 10 miles, by a person engaged in the harvesting of forestry products. Such vehicles must be operated during daylight hours only, in accordance with all safety requirements prescribed by s. 316.2295(5) and (6).

(c) – The width and height limitations of this section do not apply to farming or agricultural equipment, whether self-propelled, pulled, or hauled, when temporarily operated during daylight hours upon a public road that is not a limited access facility as defined in s. 334.03(12), and the width and height limitations may be exceeded by such equipment without a permit. To be eligible for this exemption, the equipment shall be operated within a radius of 50 miles of the real property owned, rented, managed, harvested, or leased by the equipment owner. However, equipment being delivered by a dealer to a purchaser is not subject to the 50-mile limitation. Farming or agricultural equipment greater than 174 inches in width must have one warning lamp mounted on each side of the equipment to denote the width and must have a slow-moving vehicle sign. Warning lamps required by this paragraph must be visible from the front and rear of the vehicle and must be visible from a distance of at least 1,000 feet.

(d) – The operator of equipment operated under this subsection is responsible for verifying that the route used has adequate clearance for the equipment.

(6) – TOUR TRAINS. – Any tour train or similar operation which has been continuously conducted for 120 days prior to the date this chapter becomes law is also authorized hereunder, subject to the length restriction and other restrictions imposed by law, not in conflict with the provisions of this chapter.

(7) – FIRE OR EMERGENCY VEHICLES, UTILITY VEHICLES, AND OTHER VEHICLES TRANSPORTING NONDIVISIBLE LOADS. – The length limitations imposed by this section do not apply to:

(a) – Vehicles of a fire department or emergency vehicles owned or operated by governmental entities.

(b) – Utility vehicles owned or operated by governmental entities or public utility corporations, or operated under contract with such entities or corporations:

1. – When transporting poles during daytime, except on weekends and holidays, as defined in the rules of the Department of Transportation, and when the vehicle and load do not exceed 120 feet in overall length, provided proper flags are located at the rearmost end of the load. However, such movements with an overall length in excess of 75 feet:

a. – Shall be equipped with a working warning light device.

b. – Shall be accompanied by a company-provided flasher-equipped escort vehicle when making turns within corporate city limits.

2.a. – When transporting poles during nighttime and when the vehicle and load do not exceed 120 feet in overall length. Such movements shall be equipped with a working warning light device and shall be accompanied by one leading and one trailing company-provided flasher-equipped escort vehicle.

b. – The provisions of sub-subparagraph a. notwithstanding, for vehicles and loads with overall lengths not exceeding 85 feet and being transported under emergency conditions, only a single trailing company-owned flasher-equipped escort vehicle shall be required, provided that the pole being transported shall be equipped with active marker lights, visible from both sides, at a maximum of 6-foot intervals mounted along the pole or trailer extending the length of the trailer and at 36-inch intervals along the pole extending beyond the rear of the trailer.

3. – When transporting poles during emergencies or required maintenance. Such movements may be made on all days and at all hours, provided the respective daytime or nighttime requirements are otherwise met.

4. – When operating flasher-equipped straight truck utility vehicles that have permanently mounted equipment that extends up to 9 feet beyond the front bumper, provided:

a. – Such equipment, when in the travel position, is supported in such a manner that it has a minimum of 80 inches clearance above the roadway;

b. – Such equipment is illuminated on the forwardmost sides with high visibility reflective tape;

c. – The respective daytime and nighttime requirements for operation are otherwise met;

d. – Nighttime emergency or required maintenance operation of such utility vehicles with overall lengths in excess of 50 feet are led by a company-provided flasher-equipped escort vehicle; and

e. – Trailers are not pulled by utility vehicles over 50 feet in length.

A flasher-equipped escort vehicle is defined as an automobile or truck that closely accompanies an over dimensional vehicle or load carried thereon to alert approaching traffic of that vehicle or load. Such escort vehicles shall be equipped with a working warning light device, as defined in this subsection, except that such device shall be located on top of the escort vehicle. Warning light devices required in this subsection shall be consistent with size, color, type, intensity, and mounting requirements developed by the Department of Transportation.

(c) – Truck tractor-semitrailer or pole trailer combination vehicles transporting poles or other objects of a structural nature that cannot be readily dismembered, when operating in the daytime, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays and when the vehicle and load do not exceed 75 feet when proper flags are displayed as required in s. 316.228.

(d) – Vehicles transporting tree-length unprocessed logs, when operating in the daytime and when the vehicle and load do not exceed 75 feet; but, in respect to such movement, proper flags shall be located at the extreme ends of the load.

(e) – Straight trucks transporting poles or other objects of a structural nature that cannot be readily dismembered, when operating in the daytime, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, when the load does not extend past the rearmost part of the vehicle more than one-half the length of the permanent bed or cargo-carrying structure of the vehicle, when at least two-thirds of the length of the cargo rests on the bed or cargo-carrying structure, when the load complies with subsection (4), and when proper flags are displayed in accordance with s. 316.228.

(8) – WRECKERS. – The limitations imposed by this section do not apply to a combination of motor vehicles consisting of a wrecker licensed in accordance with s. 320.08(5)(d) or (e) and a disabled motor vehicle, trailer, semitrailer, or tractor-trailer combination, or a replacement motor vehicle, which is under tow by the wrecker, if the size and weight of the towed vehicle is consistent with statutory requirements and the requirements of this subsection.

(a) – The limitations imposed by this section do not apply to a combination of motor vehicles consisting of a wrecker licensed under the International Registration Plan and a disabled motor vehicle, trailer, semitrailer, tractor-trailer combination, or a replacement motor vehicle, which is under tow by the wrecker, if the size and weight of the towed vehicle is consistent with statutory requirements and the requirements of this subsection.

(b) – However, a wrecker may not tow a disabled nonconforming vehicle operating under a current special use permit or permits where the combined weight of the wrecker and the towed nonconforming vehicle exceeds the permitted weight of the towed vehicle’s permit.

(c) – Where the combined weight of the wrecker and the towed vehicle exceeds the maximum weight limits as established by s. 316.535, the wrecker must be operating under a current wrecker special use permit or permits as provided in s. 316.550(5) or in accordance with paragraph (b).

(d) – The limitations imposed by this section do not apply to a combination of motor vehicles consisting of a wrecker licensed in accordance with s. 320.08(5)(d) or (e) and a nondisabled tractor-trailer combination that is under tow by the wrecker, if the tractor-trailer combination is being towed by the wrecker in an emergency situation as directed by a law enforcement officer. No wrecker shall tow a nondisabled tractor-trailer combination except in an emergency situation as directed by a law enforcement officer, or as provided in s. 715.07.

(9) – BUSES AND PRIVATE MOTOR COACHES. –

(a) – Anything in this chapter to the contrary notwithstanding, no bus or private motor coach may exceed a length of 50 feet, for a single-unit coach, or 65 feet, for an articulated coach. No bus or private motor coach may exceed a width of 102 inches, exclusive of safety equipment.

(b) – School buses which are subject to the provisions of s. 316.615 or chapter 1006 are exempt from the provisions of this subsection.

(10) – AUTOMOBILE TOWAWAY AND DRIVEAWAY OPERATIONS. – An automobile towaway or driveaway operation transporting new or used trucks may use what is known to the trade as “saddle mounts” if the overall length does not exceed 97 feet and no more than three saddle mounts are towed. Such combinations may include one full mount. Saddle mount combinations must also comply with the applicable safety regulations in 49 C.F.R. s. 393.71.

(11) – REFUSE COLLECTION AND TRANSPORT VEHICLES. – A combination of vehicles up to five in number is authorized for the sole purpose of collecting refuse and transporting refuse to a dump. Such a vehicle or combination of vehicles shall be covered in such a manner that refuse transported therein does not spill from the vehicles, shall otherwise comply with the provisions of this section, and shall use the state roads only to the extent necessary to collect and dispose of refuse.

(12) – TURNPIKE LIMITATIONS. – The adopted vehicle width, height, and length rules of the Florida Turnpike are in addition to the requirements of this section. Vehicles seeking to operate on the turnpike shall meet the requirements of the rules adopted by the Department of Transportation for the turnpike.

(13) – MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT. – The vehicular dimensional limitations imposed by this section do not apply to equipment owned or operated by the Department of Transportation when performing maintenance operations on public roads during daylight hours. However, such equipment shall be operated in accordance with all safety requirements prescribed by law and Department of Transportation rules.

(14) – MANUFACTURED BUILDINGS. – The Department of Transportation may, in its discretion and upon application and good cause shown therefor that the same is not contrary to the public interest, issue a special permit for truck tractor-semitrailer combinations where the total number of overwidth deliveries of manufactured buildings, as defined in s. 553.36(13), may be reduced by permitting the use of multiple sections or single units on an overlength trailer of no more than 80 feet.

(15) – MOTOR HOMES. – No motor home may exceed a length of 45 feet exclusive of bumpers and safety devices.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 74-117; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 4, ch. 79-99; ss. 3, 7, ch. 81-209; s. 3, ch. 83-298; s. 1, ch. 84-122; s. 2, ch. 85-81; s. 80, ch. 85-180; s. 3, ch. 85-343; s. 1, ch. 86-230; s. 8, ch. 86-243; s. 1, ch. 86-260; s. 1, ch. 86-282; s. 6, ch. 88-215; s. 3, ch. 88-246; s. 64, ch. 89-282; s. 1, ch. 89-320; s. 2, ch. 90-200; s. 4, ch. 91-418; s. 1, ch. 93-33; s. 4, ch. 95-247; s. 1, ch. 97-58; s. 9, ch. 97-280; s. 33, ch. 97-300; ss. 15, 16, ch. 2000-313; s. 41, ch. 2002-1; ss. 5, 69, ch. 2002-20; s. 11, ch. 2002-295; s. 957, ch. 2002-387; s. 15, ch. 2003-286; s. 11, ch. 2004-257; s. 19, ch. 2006-290; s. 13, ch. 2007-55; s. 1, ch. 2008-236; s. 11, ch. 2010-225; s. 3, ch. 2012-83; s. 19, ch. 2012-174; s. 15, ch. 2013-160; s. 4, ch. 2015-163.

Note. – Former s. 316.196.

316.516: Width, height, and length; inspection; penalties. – (1) – Any law enforcement officer, as prescribed in s. 316.640, or any weight inspector of the Department of Transportation, as prescribed in s. 316.545(1), who has reason to believe that the width, height, or length of a vehicle or combination of vehicles and the load thereon is not in conformance with s. 316.515 is authorized to require the driver to stop and submit such vehicle and load to measurement of its width, height, or length.

(2) – Whenever an officer, upon measuring a vehicle or combination of vehicles and the load thereon, determines that such vehicle exceeds the dimensional criteria established in s. 316.515 and that no valid special permit exists for such vehicle or vehicles, the officer may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place and leave it standing until either:

(a) – A special permit is obtained in accordance with s. 316.550; or

(b) – All offending irregularities are corrected.

(3) – Special permit fees and civil penalties that may be incurred pursuant to the requirements of this section are in addition to the citation for a nonmoving violation and the penalties that may be imposed under chapter 318.

(4) – Notwithstanding other provisions of this chapter, penalties for violation of the maximum limits for width, height, and length provided for in s. 316.515 are as follows:

(a) – Two hundred and fifty dollars per foot of violation or any portion thereof for width and height limit violations.

(b)1. – Forty dollars for length limit violations not exceeding 2 feet over the length limit;

2. – One hundred dollars for length limit violations of greater than 2 feet but not exceeding 10 feet over the length limit; or

3. – Two hundred and fifty dollars for length limit violations of greater than 10 feet, plus $250 for every additional foot or any portion thereof that exceeds 11 feet over the length limit.

(c) – No individual penalty issued under the provisions of this subsection shall exceed $1,000 for each width, height, or length violation.

(5) – All penalties imposed for violations of this section shall be assessed, collected, and deposited in accordance with the provisions of s. 316.545(6).

History – s. 4, ch. 83-298; s. 3, ch. 85-81; s. 1, ch. 85-87; s. 2, ch. 90-177; s. 5, ch. 95-247; s. 33, ch. 96-350; s. 34, ch. 97-300; s. 12, ch. 2011-66.

316.520: Loads on vehicles. – (1) – A vehicle may not be driven or moved on any highway unless the vehicle is so constructed or loaded as to prevent any of its load from dropping, shifting, leaking, blowing, or otherwise escaping therefrom, except that sand may be dropped only for the purpose of securing traction or water or other substance may be sprinkled on a roadway in cleaning or maintaining the roadway.

(2) – It is the duty of every owner and driver, severally, of any vehicle hauling, upon any public road or highway open to the public, dirt, sand, lime rock, gravel, silica, or other similar aggregate or trash, garbage, any inanimate object or objects, or any similar material that could fall or blow from such vehicle, to prevent such materials from falling, blowing, or in any way escaping from such vehicle. Covering and securing the load with a close-fitting tarpaulin or other appropriate cover or a load securing device meeting the requirements of 49 C.F.R. s. 393.100 or a device designed to reasonably ensure that cargo will not shift upon or fall from the vehicle is required and shall constitute compliance with this section.

(3)(a) – Except as provided in paragraph (b), a violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

(b) – Any person who willfully violates the provisions of this section which offense results in serious bodily injury or death to an individual and which offense occurs as a result of failing to comply with subsections (1) and (2) commits a criminal traffic offense and a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

(4) – The provision of subsection (2) requiring covering and securing the load with a close-fitting tarpaulin or other appropriate cover does not apply to vehicles carrying agricultural products locally from a harvest site or to or from a farm on roads where the posted speed limit is 65 miles per hour or less and the distance driven on public roads is less than 20 miles.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 73-174; s. 1, ch. 74-111; s. 1, ch. 76-31; ss. 5, 235, ch. 99-248; ss. 70, 106, ch. 2002-20; s. 4, ch. 2002-235.

Note. – Former s. 316.198.

316.525: Requirements for vehicles hauling loads. – (1) – It is the duty of every owner, licensee, and driver, severally, of any truck, trailer, semitrailer, or pole trailer to use such stanchions, standards, stays, supports, or other equipment, appliances, or contrivances, together with one or more lock chains, when lock chains are the most suitable means of fastening the load, or together with nylon strapping, when nylon strapping is the most suitable means of securing the load, so as to fasten the load securely to the vehicle.

(2) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a nonmoving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; ss. 1, 2, ch. 80-229; s. 190, ch. 81-259; s. 236, ch. 99-248; s. 25, ch. 2013-18.

Note. – Former s. 316.280.

316.530: Towing requirements. – (1) – When one vehicle is towing another vehicle the drawbar or other connection shall be of sufficient strength to pull all weight towed thereby, and said drawbar or other connection shall not exceed 15 feet from one vehicle to the other except the connection between any two vehicles transporting poles, pipe, machinery or other objects of structural nature which cannot readily be dismembered. When one vehicle is towing another vehicle and the connection consists of a chain, rope, or cable, there shall be displayed upon such connection a white flag or cloth not less than 12 inches square.

(2) – When a vehicle is towing a trailer or semitrailer on a public road or highway by means of a trailer hitch to the rear of the vehicle, there shall be attached in addition thereto safety chains, cables, or other safety devices that comply with 49 C.F.R. subpart F, ss. 393.71(g)(2)(1) and 393.71(h)(10) from the trailer or semitrailer to the vehicle. These safety chains, cables, or other safety devices shall be of sufficient strength to maintain connection of the trailer or semitrailer to the pulling vehicle under all conditions while the trailer or semitrailer is being towed by the vehicle. The provisions of this subsection shall not apply to trailers or semitrailers using a hitch known as a fifth wheel nor to farm equipment traveling less than 20 miles per hour.

(3) – A violation of this section is a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a moving violation as provided in chapter 318.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 1, ch. 76-91; s. 124, ch. 79-400; s. 237, ch. 99-248; s. 17, ch. 2000-313; s. 3, ch. 2014-223.

Note. – Former s. 316.205.

316.535: Maximum weights. – (1) – The gross weight imposed on the highway by the wheels of any one axle of a vehicle shall not exceed 20,000 pounds.

(2) – For the purposes of this chapter, an “axle load” shall be defined as the total load transmitted to the road by all wheels whose centers are included between two parallel transverse vertical planes 40 inches apart, extending across the full width of the vehicle.

(3) – Subject to the limit upon the weight imposed upon the highways through any one axle as set forth herein, the total weight with load imposed upon the highway by all the axles of a vehicle or combination of vehicles shall not exceed the gross weight given for the respective distance between the first and last axle of the vehicle or combination of vehicles, measured longitudinally to the nearest foot as set forth in the following table:

Distance in feet
between first and
last axles of ve-
hicles or combi-
nation of vehicles.
Maximum load in
pounds on all
axles.
4 40,000
5 40,000
6 40,000
7 40,000
8 40,000
9 44,140
10 44,980
11 45,810
12 46,640
13 47,480
14 48,310
15 49,150
16 49,980
17 50,810
18 51,640
19 52,480
20 53,310
21 54,140
22 54,980
23 55,810
24 56,640
25 57,470
26 58,310
27 59,140
28 59,970
29 60,810
30 61,640
31 62,470
32 63,310
33 64,140
34 64,970
35 65,800
36 66,610

(4) – With respect to the Interstate Highway System, in all cases in which it exceeds state law in effect on January 4, 1975, the overall gross weight on a group of two or more consecutive axles of a vehicle or combination of vehicles, including all enforcement tolerances, shall be as determined by the following formula:

W = 500((LN ÷ (N–1)) + 12N + 36)

where W = the overall gross weight on any group of two or more consecutive axles to the nearest 500 pounds; L = the distance in feet between the extremes of any group of two or more consecutive axles; and N = the number of axles in the group under consideration. Such overall gross weight of any vehicle or combination of vehicles may not exceed 80,000 pounds, including all enforcement tolerances.

(5) – With respect to those highways not in the Interstate Highway System, in all cases in which it exceeds state law in effect on January 4, 1975, the overall gross weight on the vehicle or combination of vehicles, including all enforcement tolerances, shall be as determined by the following formula:

W = 500((LN ÷ (N–1)) + 12N + 36)

where W = overall gross weight of the vehicle to the nearest 500 pounds; L = distance in feet between the extreme of the external axles; and N = number of axles on the vehicle. However, such overall gross weight of any vehicle or combination of vehicles may not exceed 80,000 pounds including all enforcement tolerances.

(6) – Dump trucks, concrete mixing trucks, trucks engaged in waste collection and disposal, and fuel oil and gasoline trucks designed and constructed for special type work or use, when operated as a single unit, shall be subject to all safety and operational requirements of law, except that any such vehicle need not conform to the axle spacing requirements of this section provided that such vehicle shall be limited to a total gross load, including the weight of the vehicle, of 20,000 pounds per axle plus scale tolerances and shall not exceed 550 pounds per inch width tire surface plus scale tolerances. No vehicle operating pursuant to this section shall exceed a gross weight, including the weight of the vehicle and scale tolerances, of 70,000 pounds. Any vehicle violating the weight provisions of this section shall be penalized as provided in s. 316.545.

(7) – The Department of Transportation shall adopt rules to implement this section, shall enforce this section and the rules adopted hereunder, and shall publish and distribute tables and other publications as deemed necessary to inform the public.

(8) – Except as hereinafter provided, no vehicle or combination of vehicles exceeding the gross weights specified in subsections (3), (4), (5), and (6) shall be permitted to travel on the public highways within the state.

History – s. 1, ch. 71-135; s. 1, ch. 75-47; s. 1, ch. 76-31; s. 90, ch. 77-104; s. 1, ch. 79-276; s. 2, ch. 80-298; s. 8, ch. 83-298; s. 6, ch. 2002-20.

Note. – Former s. 316.199.